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Rompi Bottlebreaker brings a cost effective solution to container recycling

Crushing and screening specialist Pilot Crushtec International has always been passionate about recycling and has added an innovative dimension to the concept with the diminutive Rompi Bottlebreaker.

Glass is an infinitely recyclable material and the Jet Park company has designed and built the Rompi to put cost effective recycling well within the reach of businesses whose stock in trade revolves around bottled products. Winemakers, vineyards, distilleries, specialist breweries, high traffic bars and caterers form the natural target market for a realistically priced product, which will easily fit onto the back of a bakkie.

Stellenbosch-based Home of Origin Wines, a major exporter and multiple service provider to the wine industry recently bought a Rompi Bottlebreaker to facilitate the clearance of broken bottles from its filling line.

“Breakages are common in a high speed process like bottling and broken glass is not only hazardous but is also costly to remove,” says Pilot Crushtec International, national sales manager Nicolan Govender.

Govender explains that glass crushed by the Bottlebreaker takes up 80% less space than bottles which not only creates extra space in the workplace but also dramatically reduces the cost of transporting reject bottles back to the manufacturer.

“By utilising the Rompi Bottle Breaker the recycling process has effectively begun on site and crushed glass is comparatively safer and easier to handle than bottles. The product itself occupies about the same amount of space as a domestic refrigerator but is still capable of disposing up to 1500 bottles per hour.”